Jack Up Rig Footing – Mat Footings vs Independent Spud Can Footings

Jack up units have footings to increase bearing area of each leg. This will result in reduction of load capacity of soil to deliver a firm foundation for a jack up rig to stand and transfer weight to the sea floor . With two different types of footing, spud cans and mats, it is important to know the main differences that exist.

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Introduction to a Jack Up Rig

A Jack Up is a type of offshore drilling rigs. It is made up of a hull, legs, and a lifting system and a jack up rig can be towed to the offshore site, and then lower its legs into the seabed to lift up the hull, providing a stable work deck which is strong enough to cope with the required environmental loads.

Another advantage of Jack Up rigs is that they can operate in high wind speeds and with significant wave heights, as well as in water depths reaching 500 feet. Since the Jack Up will be ultimately supported by the seabed, they are usually preloaded upon arrival at the intended site to simulate the kind of leg loads that they will be exposed to. This ensures that once the rig is fully jacked up and in operation, the seabed will be able to provide a strong foundation for the rig.

The offshore industry has made significant use of Jack Up rigs for over 60 years now. They are especially useful for exploration drilling since they are relatively easy to set up, and also provide ample production, accommodation, and maintenance areas. Over the years, Jack Ups have been pushed to their limits in terms of what they can do. This includes their deck load carrying limits both when afloat and when elevated, their environmental and drilling limits, and the soil, or foundation, limits. By pushing these limits, drilling companies have been able to explore deeper waters, drill deep reservoirs in harsh conditions, and even drill in areas with unstable soils and foundations. Continue reading

Categories of Well Control

Well control can be categorized into three main categories which are Primary Well Control, Secondary Well Control and Tertiary Well Control. The details are shown below;

Primary Well Control

Primary Well Control is hydrostatic pressureprovided by drilling fluid more than formation pressure but less than fracture gradient while drilling. If hydrostatic pressure is less than reservoir pressure, reservoir fluid may influx into wellbore. This situation is called “Loss Primary Well Control”. Typically, slightly overbalance of hydrostatic pressure over reservoir pressure is normally desired. The basic of maintaining primary well control is to maintain hydrostatic pressure that is heavy enough to overcome formation pressure but not fracture formations.

Figure 1 - Drilling Fluid

Figure 1 – Drilling Fluid

Not only is hydrostatic pressure more than formation pressure, but also hydrostatic pressure must not exceed fracture gradient. If mud in hole is too heavy, it will cause a broken wellbore, that will result in loss circulation problem (partially lost or total lost circulation). When fluid is losing into formation, mud level in well bore will be decreased that will cause reduction in hydrostatic pressure. For the worst case scenario, hydrostatic pressure is less than formation pressure therefore wellbore influx (kick) will enter into wellbore. Continue reading

Junk Removal Tools Used for Drilling and Workover Operation

Junk refers to any objects or debris which have been dropped into or lost in the hole. Junk can include all manner of things, from downhole tools and bottomhole assembly components, to bit cones, or even hand tools which have been accidentally dropped into the hole. In some cases, it may be clear what the junk is, such as when something has been visibly dropped down the hole. On the other hand, though, it may sometimes be unclear just what is causing the problem. While drilling is taking place, junk can be detected by an irregular torque, or by the drill being unable to move ahead when a new bit has been run. In order to remove any junk from a well, junk removal tools will be used depending on a particular condition of junk and wellbore.

There are three main ways that junk can be dealt with; which method is chosen will depend on the size of the junk itself, and how hard the formation is. The junk can be recovered whole, split into smaller pieces so that these pieces can be recovered or that they are too small to cause any additional issues, or finally pushed into the side of a soft formation or the bottom of a formation with a large enough rathole. If none of these are possible and the junk continues to interfere with well operations, then the well made need to be sidetracked or abandoned.

The junk removal tools are as follows;

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Wireline Tool Recovery In Case of Wireline Tool Stuck

Wireline tool such as logging tool, slick line tool can be stuck in the hole therefore we need to understand about wireline recovery tool. This article demonstrate typical wireline fishing / recovery tool.  Common wireline tool issues center around the cable being tangled or wadded in the hole, as well as the fact that attempts at fishing can pull the wireline out of the rope socket or part, further complicating tool retrieval.

Stuck Cable or Tools

As soon as a wireline assembly becomes stuck, the operator will need to determine whether the problem is in the cable or the tool. Usually, one would apply normal logging tension on the cable and allow it to sit for a few minutes. During this time, four things should be recorded:

  1. the current depth of the tool
  2. the type and size of the cable
  3. the surface tension of the cable just prior to becoming stuck
  4. the cable-head’s weakpoint rating

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