How Does 1029.4 Come From?

1029.4 is used in several calculations in the oilfield and we’ve been asked about what is 1029.4, how it comes from, why it needs to be this figure so in this article, we will show you how 1029.4 comes from.

how-does-1029.4-come-from

First of all, we would like to give someone about the background of this figure. The 1029.4 is widely used for capacity calculations. The following equations utilizing 1029.4 are listed below; Continue reading

Hydrostatic Pressure (HP) Decrease When POOH

When pulling out of hole, volume of steel will be out of hole and mud volume will replace the steel volume.  If we don’t fill hole, hydrostatic pressure will decrease. There are 2 cases of pulling pipe which are pull dry and pull wet. Each condition is different in calculation concept because mud volume to displace pipe volume is different.

This topic shows you how to calculate hydrostatic pressure loss for both cases of pulling pipe, pull dry and pull wet. Moreover, there is the Excel sheet for calculating pressure decrease due to pulling out of hole.

Case#1: When pulling DRY pipe

When pulling dry, we will consider volume of steel out of hole only.

Step 1: Determine Total Pipe Volume

Step 2: Determine Hydrostatic Pressure Decrease

Example: Determine the hydrostatic pressure decrease when pulling DRY pipe out of the hole:

Number of stands pulled = 10
Pipe displacement = 0.0055 bbl/ft
Average length per stand = 91 ft
Casing capacity = 0.0873 bbl/ft
Mud weight = 12.0 ppg

Step 1: Determine of pipe displacement in Barrels = 10 stands x 91 ft/std x 0.0055 bbl/ft displaced
Barrels displaced = 5.01 bbl
Step 2: Determine HP, psi decrease = 5.01 barrels x 0.052 x 12.0 ppg ÷ (0.0873 bbl/ft – 0.0055 bbl/ft)
Hydrostatic pressure decrease = 38.2 psi

Case#2: When pulling WET pipe

When pulling wet, we will consider volume of steel out of hole and volume of mud in drillpipe as well. Therefore, pulling wet will decrease hydrostatic more than pulling dry pipe.

Step 1: Barrels displaced = number of stands pulled per stand in ft
x average length x {pipe disp inbbl/ft + {(% volume in drill pipe out of hole ÷ 100) x pipe cap in bbl/ft)}

Step 2: Determine hydrostatic pressure in psi decrease = barrels displaced x 0.052 x mud weight, ppg ÷ ((casing capacity in bbl/ft) – (Pipe disp in bbl/ft + pipe cap in bbl/ft))

Example: Determine the hydrostatic pressure decrease when pulling WET pipe out of the
hole:

% of volume in drill pipe out of hole = 100
Number of stands pulled = 10
Pipe displacement = 0.0055 bbl/ft
Average length per stand = 91 ft
Pipe capacity = 0.01876 bbl/ft
Mud weight = 12.0 ppg
Casing capacity = 0.0873 bbl/ft

Step 1: Barrels displaced = 10 stands x 91 ft/std x {(.0055 bbl/ft + (100 ÷ 100) x 0.01876 bbl/ft)}
Barrels displaced = 22.08 bbl

Step 2: hydrostatic pressure in psi decrease = 22.0766 barrels x 0.052 x 12.0 ppg ÷ ((0.0873 bbl/ft) – (0.0055 bbl/ft + 0.01876 bbl/ft))
HP decrease, psi = 218.52 psi

Please find the Excel sheet for calculating pressure decrease due to pulling out of hole.

Ref book: Drilling Formula Book Formulas and Calculations for Drilling, Production and Workover, Second Edition

Calculate Annular Capacity

Annular capacity , which is one of basic values that you really need to understand, is volume of fluid between two diameter of cylindrical objects per length or length per volume. This article demonstrates you how to calculate annular capacity between casing or hole and drill pipe, tubing, or casing. There are several formulas as shown below to calculate annular capacity depending on unit of annular capacity required.

Note: Dh is bigger ID and Dp is smaller OD. The examples below will show the Dh as hole size and Dp is drill pipe OD

a) Calculate annular capacity in bbl/ft

Annular capacity in bbl/ft =  (Dh2 – Dp2) ÷1029.4

Example: Hole size (Dh) = 6-1/8 in.
Drill pipe OD (Dp) = 3.5  in.
Annular capacity in bbl/ft = (6.1252 – 3.5 2) ÷1029.4
Annular capacity = 0.0245 bbl/ft

b) Calculate annular capacity in ft/bbl

Annular capacity in ft/bbl = 1029.4 ÷ (Dh2 – Dp2)

Example: Hole size (Dh) = 6-1/8 in.
Drill pipe OD (Dp) = 3.5  in.
Annular capacity in ft/bbl = 1029.4 ÷ (6.125 2 – 3.5 2)
Annular capacity = 40.743 ft/bbl

c) Calculate annular capacity in gal/ft

Annular capacity in gal/ft = (Dh2 – Dp2) ÷ 24.51

Example: Hole size (Dh) = 6-1/8 in.
Drill pipe OD (Dp) = 3.5  in.
Annular capacity in gal/ft = (6.125 2 – 3.52) ÷24.51
Annular capacity = 1.031 gal/ft

d) Calculate annular capacity in ft/gal

Annular capacity, ft/gal = 24.51 ÷ (Dh2 – Dp2)

Example: Hole size (Dh) = 6-1/8 in.
Drill pipe OD (Dp) = 3.5  in.
Annular capacity in ft/gal = 24.51 ÷  (6.125 2 – 3.5 2)
Annular capacity in ft/gal = 0.97 ft/gal

Annular volume can be determined by this following formula;

Annular volume in bbl  = annular capacity (bbl/ft) x length of annulus (ft)

Note: annular volume can be expressed in several unit depending on unit that you use in the calculation.

Example:

Annular capacity = 0.0245 bbl/ft
Length of annulus = 1000 ft

Annular volume = 1000 x 0.0245 = 24.5 bbl.

** Please remember that if you have several annular profile, you must calculate volume based on each annular profile in order to get total annular volume.

Please find the Excel sheet for calculating annular capacity.

Ref books: Lapeyrouse, N.J., 2002. Formulas and calculations for drilling, production and workover, Boston: Gulf Professional publishing.

Bourgoyne, A.J.T., Chenevert , M.E. & Millheim, K.K., 1986. SPE Textbook Series, Volume 2: Applied Drilling Engineering, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

Mitchell, R.F., Miska, S. & Aadny, B.S., 2011. Fundamentals of drilling engineering, Richardson, TX: Society of Petroleum Engineers.