Cutting Slip Velocity Calculation Method 2

This is another method to determine cutting slip velocity. The process of calculation is quite different from the first method however it is still straight forward calculation. It still gives you the following answers: annular velocity, cutting slip velocity and net velocity.

 

Let’s get started with this calculation method.

 

1. Determine n

Where;

n is the power law exponent.

Θ600 is a value at 600 viscometer dial reading.

Θ300 is a value at 300 viscometer dial reading.

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Cutting Slip Velocity Calculation Method 1

Cutting slip velocity is velocity of cutting that naturally falls down due to its density. In order to effectively clean the hole, effect of mud flow upward direction and mud properties must be greater than cutting slip velocity (settling tendency of cuttings). Otherwise, cutting will fall down and create cutting bed.

You can learn more detail about it via this topic -> Cutting Slip Velocity

This calculation will show annular velocity, cutting slip velocity and net velocity so you can use as a reference for you hole cleaning indication.

There are 2 calculation methods and I will show the first method via this topic.

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Drilling Formula Calculation Sheet Version 1

This is drilling formula calculation sheet v1 distributed on 28-Mar-10. I add many essential drilling formulas in to one Excel spread sheet and I would like to share with you for FREE. Please check this following link for download.

 

Drilling Formula Calculation Sheet v1

 

When you one the file Drilling-formulas-Calculation-shee-V1.xls, you will see the fist page call index page which shows you all of formulas like this.

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Drilling Formulas and Calculation Summary Page

I created summary page for drilling formulas and calculations (https://www.drillingformulas.com/drilling-formulas-and-calculation-sheets/). I wish these excel sheets would be helpful for you.

Amount of cuttings produced per foot of hole drilled
Annular Pressure Loss
Annular-Capacity
Annular-velocity
Bulk Density Calculation
Buoyancy Factor Oilfield
Convert Pressure to Equivalent Mud Weight
Convert-Specific-Gravity
Cost Per Foot Calculation
Critical RPM
D Exponent Calculation
D Exponent Corrected Calculation
Decrease Oil Water Ratio
Density of Oil Water Mixture
Depth of Washout
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Understand Hydrostatic Pressure

In a well, any pressure created by a static column of fluid is called ‘Hydrostatic Pressure’ (HP); at any given True Vertical Depth (TVD). With ‘hydro’ representing water, which exerts pressure, ‘static’ means it has no movement. Any pressure developed by a column of fluid that isn’t moving, therefore, can be considered hydrostatic pressure; fluid in this sense can be either liquid or gas.

The relationship of hydrostatic pressure is shown in the equation below.

HP (Hydrostatic Pressure) = density x g (gravity acceleration) x h (True Vertical Depth, TVD)

In oilfield term, the formula above is modified so that people can use it easily. The formulas are as follows:

HP (Hydrostatic Pressure) = Constant x MW (Mud Weight or Mud Density)  x TVD (True Vertical Depth)

HP (psi)  = 0.052 x MW (ppg) x TVD (ft) ** Most frequent used in the oilfield **

HP (psi) = 0.007 x MW (pcf) x TVD (ft)

HP (kPa) = 0.00981 x MW (kg/m3) x TVD (m)

Depending on which unit is used for calculation, there are several conversion factors such as 0.052, 0.007, 0.00981 for instant as you can see from the equations above.

According to the equations above, Hydrostatic Pressure is not a function of hole geometry. Only mud weight and True Vertical Depth (TVD) affect on Hydrostatic Pressure. For example (a picture below); well A and well B have the same vertical depth. With the same mud density in hole, the bottom hole pressure due to hydrostatic pressure is the same. The only different between Well A and Well B is mud volume.

This concept is basic and very important for many aspects such as well control, balance cementing, u-tube, etc.

You can learn more about hydrostatic pressure calculation from the following article – Hydrostatic Pressure Calculation

Pressure in a well

In a static condition

  • Pressure at any depth = Hydrostatic Pressure (HP) + Surface Pressure (SP)
  • Pressure between 2 points is HP between these points

The diagram below demonstrates the relationship of pressure in a well.

At point 1, Pressure@1 = Surface Pressure (SP) + Hydrostatic Pressure @ 1 (HP1)

At point 1, Pressure@2 = Surface Pressure (SP) + Hydrostatic Pressure@1 (HP1) + Hydrostatic Pressure@2 (HP2)

Ref books: 

Lapeyrouse, N.J., 2002. Formulas and calculations for drilling, production and workover, Boston: Gulf Professional publishing.

Bourgoyne, A.J.T., Chenevert , M.E. & Millheim, K.K., 1986. SPE Textbook Series, Volume 2: Applied Drilling Engineering, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

Mitchell, R.F., Miska, S. & Aadny, B.S., 2011. Fundamentals of drilling engineering, Richardson, TX: Society of Petroleum Engineers.